Alternatives to Higher Education: What’s Your Plan?

Alternatives to Higher Education: What’s Your Plan?

Parenting is a challenge as any parent will tell you.  Education is one of the parenting issues that consume a large portion of parental thought life. Once parents have gotten their child through elementary, middle and high school, what do they do about college?

Related Post:  6 Key Insights from Homeschool Moms

We will explore some alternatives to higher education.

Parents are concerned about the high cost of college, the pressure to fit in and conform, and making it through to graduation.

Interestingly, parents have held to the idea that the traditional four-year college is the only path after high school.   There are some alternatives to higher education that parents should consider.

Alternatives to Higher Education and College Debt

Many schools offer some level of scholarship or grants to students.  This is helpful to a point.  Grants and scholarships do not need to be paid back. However, students find that there is still a gap in tuition they are responsible for.

If three-quarters of the bill is covered by grants and scholarship that leaves one-quarter of the cost for the family to come up with. If that is $25,000, that amount is multiplied by four in order to get to graduation. For most students that means school loans that will follow the student for several years after graduation.

I am not saying the students and families should not pay for education.  It is reasonable to pay for your education.  Parents need to consider how much college costs and what the expected return on that investment will be.

The cost of college is increasing at a rate that is alarming and debilitating.  You and your student need to look closely at the academic major of interest.  Your student may not need to go the traditional route to work in their field of choice.  Steer clear of majors that do not lead to being employed after graduation.  In other words, if the major being considered sounds like “Underwater Basket Weaving,” run with all your might in the other direction.

The Burden of Debt

Debt looms heavy over the heads of young people long after they have left the halls of higher learning.

In addition, many students that enter college with the intention of earning a four-year degree, do not graduate. The college may not be a good fit for the student or traumatic events can cut a college career short.

Tragically, young adults are left to pay off a debt that represents time spent on the college campus but no diploma. Click To Tweet Without the diploma, their chances of landing a higher paying job can seem slim.

The future looks very bleak for these students. That’s a terrible way to begin life as an adult.  Debt hinders these young adults’ chance of having a disposable income to purchase a car or home.  The pattern is a cruel one and needs to be changed.

Alternatives to Higher Education and Pressures of College Life

Furthermore, students face pressures that lead to poor decisions that impact the rest of their lives.

Students will be challenged on many different fronts:

  • time management
  • homesickness
  • drug and alcohol experimentation and use
  • premarital sex
  • situations that challenge long-held values

Parents send their children off to college with the hopes that their child will hold onto the values instilled in them but temptations often overpower solid foundations.

The cyber world provides an opportunity for young adults to dive into a dark and dangerous world. The hope is that students will exercise good judgment in this area.  Parents, stay connected with your children.  The cyber world can be a place of temptation and danger for your young person.  Keep the lines of communication open.

Alternatives to Higher Education

Hopefully, these alternatives to higher education will give you a place to start looking for different paths to post-secondary education.

Think about what the end game is.  Young adults need to be independent thinkers.  They need to be able to take care of themselves once they leave school.  Young people should be able to use their gifts and talents in their chosen career.

I think about Charlotte Mason’s approach to education.  She encouraged teachers to include teaching a practical craft that students could then use as a possible means of earning money.  This was not the type of craft that you stick on the refrigerator door just to be admired.  These crafts had an actual function and use.

STEM careers or medical licenses require the traditional college path. Many careers, however, do not need a traditional college degree.

Start a Business

In the age of the internet, the possibility of starting an online business is a viable alternative to higher education.  Think outside the box.  Your son or daughter’s natural gifts and abilities may find a place in the marketplace. Video platforms are flourishing which makes it possible for your child to teach something on their own Youtube or Periscope channel.

Learn a Trade

Many of our craftsmen are getting older and which is leaving a gap that the younger generation can fill.  Young adults can learn a skilled trade and earn a very good living. This is another alternative that may not require a four-year degree. Auto mechanics and photographers are invaluable.  Appliance repairmen command good salaries as well.  These are jobs that are valuable but do not necessarily require a four-year degree.

Mike Rowe has found a new appreciation for skilled labor.  He has written a book entitled Profoundly Disconnected which highlights the beauty of doing an honest day’s hard work. Check out the Mike Rowe’s reading here. He focusses on the skilled labor jobs.  He is attempting to help others appreciate these jobs.  The skilled labor or blue collar jobs have lost esteem in the eyes of many of our youth.

Perhaps that is a mistake.

These are jobs that may not be glamorous but one can raise a family.  Enjoy Mike reading the preface to his book. You will enjoy the book but please, do not listen to it while you are eating.  You have been warned. Click the link at the bottom.

Community College

The community college is another alternative to higher education.  If a four-year college is still a goal of your young adult, encourage them to look into community colleges for the basic courses. Students take general education courses in community college at a fraction of the cost of a four-year college.  This allows the student to save money as they complete approximately half of their college coursework at an institution that costs a portion of the four-year college cost.

Apprenticeships

Apprenticeships are also great alternatives to going the traditional higher education route.  They are similar to internships in that they both offer close interaction with a seasoned skilled laborer.  This relationship allows for the expert in the relationship to give the student close instruction and supervision as the student is learning a new skill.  Apprenticeships are paid position. This is the difference between the two opportunities.  The construction industry is experiencing growth in the offering apprenticeships

Additional information on Apprenticeships may be found in companies like Echoing Green and UnCollege Gap Year.

Join the Military

The military life can be a good alternative to higher education for a young man or woman. I have written a blog post about homeschoolers and humanity and the military academies.  There are many homeschool families that may be interested in the academies.  Read the post to find out what you will need if you are a homeschool family.  They are it’s an opportunity for young men and women to dig deep and find the courage and strength to serve our country.  Students can get a sense of what military life is like by joining Jr. ROTC in high school.  The military life is one of discipline and dedication students can gain a sense of patriotism and loyalty.

Interestingly, our young adults have many freedoms they may not be ready for. They may not say it out loud, but they enjoy the structure that the military life offers.  The structure allows the young adult to mature and discover his or her strengths and weaknesses while contribution to the defense of his or her country.

Finally, it is easy to see that there are several options to the traditional higher education route.  Hopefully, this will give some insight as to what is possible for a young adult.  Are there other options not mentioned here? Do you have an opportunity for a young high school graduate?

 

 

 

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Back to School Read Alouds for Teachers and Homeschool Moms

Back to School Read Alouds for Teachers and Homeschool Moms

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Wonderful Fall Read Alouds for teachers and homeschool parents.

I know it may be a little early to think about Fall Read Alouds for the classroom, but maybe not.

Some schools go year-round so if you are a teacher or a parent your classroom may become active at the end of July or certainly by mid-August.  Why not have a look at these wonderful books and plan your library trips or make purchase for your child’s teacher.  I spent 20 years in the classroom and it was always nice to get gifts that made teaching easier without having to come out of my pocket.

Check out these books that focus on leaves turning in fall and other fall activities.  Some of these would make great introductions into science units on the seasons.

I have included Youtube links for the read alouds if you would like to use them.

Have fun

Fletcher and the Falling Leaves by Julia Rawlinson and Tiphanie Beeke

Fletcher’s tree is a wonderful friend. When the leaves start to fall, Fletcher reassures his tree friend that there is nothing to worry about.  All will be well.  Fletcher is not able to keep the leaves from falling off  his wonderful friend.  He is worried.  Fletcher then makes a wonderful discovery.  Read to find out what the discovery is.  Enjoy the Youtube video as well.

Why Leaves Change Color by Betsy Maestro and Loretta Krupinski

Why Leaves Change Color shows the reason why leaves change color in the fall.  It explains the leaf structure as well as how leaves use sunlight and cold when they are changing color. This is a great book for introducing fall and the changing of the leaves to elementary aged children.  You would enjoy reading this to your students yourself or you can use the Youtube video.  Enjoy learning about the changing colors.

Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf by Lois Ehlert

The maple leaf is center stage in Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf.  This is another wonderful read aloud that tells  the story of a maple leaf’s beginnings and growth.  The growth of the tree is chronicled is this story  Children will enjoy seeing what the seed of the maple leaf tree looks like.  This story will guide the children along the life cycle of the maple leaf to where we see the leaves turn beautiful colors.  The story ends where it began with the seed of the maple leaf falling to the ground.  Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf is another great book that can be read by the teacher or enjoyed on Youtube.  This is great for life cycle lessons and plant parts and function.

Fall Read Alouds

Fall Read Alouds

There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed Some Leaves by Lucille Colandro

There was an Old Lady Who Swallowed Some Leaves is a whimsical tale of an old lady that swallowed some leaves and many other things that we see in the fall of the year. When the old lady finally sneezes at the end she creates a wonderful fall like item.  There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed Some Leaves is available on Youtube or you can enjoy reading this yourself.

When the Leaf Blew In by Steve Metzger

When the Leaf Blew In is a whimsical story of a fall leaf blowing in a barn.  A cow sneezes which begins a whole series of events that cause much mayhem.  Enjoy When the Leaf Blew In story on the Youtube.

Leaf Man by Lois Ehlert

Leaf Man is another story that involves beautiful fall leaves. This story follows the travels of the leaf man as the wind carries him along.  His travels take him along many sights and sounds of the fall. The illustrations show wonderful formations of the things that the leaf man seas in his travels.  Wouldn’t it be fun to collect different types of leaves and create some of the things the leaf man sees. You might even be able to identify the leaves and its parts. Enjoy the Leaf Man as a read aloud or on Youtube video.

The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle

This story of the Grouchy Ladybug is a wonderful read aloud. Students will learn about how ladybugs eat aphids off of plants.  Mr 7, the reader of the story, does a particularly good job of reading this story.  You will enjoy him.  The Grouchy Ladybug in this story learns that it is best not to live a life being grouchy.   Enjoy this wonderful story on Youtube or read it aloud yourself.

First Day Jitters by Julie Danneberg

First Day Jitters. Every child is experience First Day Jitters when going to a new school or a new class.  It is not unusual to feel nervous about the things we that are not familiar to us.  This is a story of First Day Jitters and how they are overcome.  Enjoy First Day Jitters on Youtube. 

Enjoy these books as the fall rolls in. Several of theme are perfect for those science units and others are just plain fun to read as the school year begins.  You will notice that the books have clickable YouTube links for your convenience.  As I’m sure you are aware, reading out loud to your children is one of the best ways for children to hear what good reading sounds like.  This is a foundational step in reading comprehension.  You may notice your child wanting to read to you.

What are some of your favorite books to read. Do you have any fall favorites?  Are there any books in general that are favorites.  Leave a comment in the comment section and enjoy the new school year.

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